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The use of the frame helps guide the viewer to the center of interest of a picture. Overhanging foliage, the arch of a building, or in this case, a simple building identification sign will serve the purpose. Backlighting helps illuminate the arms and highlights the hair, but fill-in flash is absolutely essential to help balance the light. Avoid over-flashing to preserve some shadow, necessary for the proper perception of backlighting. Interestingly, the contrast seen in this light-supplemented photo is about what the human eye would see in real life. The eye has a marvelous ability to see through dark areas of a scene which would literally go black on film. 


Good

Most pictures taken are of people. We inherently just like to look at others. Here we have tripled the fun by giving Vanessa some company. Of course this picture is contrived for there are no checkers on the table; its all pretend! The tip in this one is to not snap the shutter until the little ones lose interest in the camera and stop the usual mugging. The boy in the center is Manley, nicknamed, "Man-Man". The missy to the right is Veronica.


Good

It is a commonly held view that midday hours are best for picture taking. On the contrary as this picture shows, often early or late in the day would yield better results. The building here was taken by noon illumination. The front of the building fails to receive direct light which would improve rendering of its brickwork. The harsh overhead lighting also causes excessive contrast which cannot be reduced. If possible, plan your shoot of real estate in terms of the best angle of light and wait for the right time of day. In this case, an early morning session would have front lighted the building and the sky would likely have registered blue instead of being washed out.


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